Anxiety N=1

So I’m starting to take myo-inositol to address symptoms of anxiety and some depression.  As I described in a previous post, clinical studies indicate this stuff can be as effective as SSRIs, without the side effects.

So I decided to do my own N=1 study on the effects of myo-inositol on anxiety.  This won’t be the greatest experiment the world has ever known, because there are confounding factors.  I’ve started exercising more recently, and I’ve reduced the stress in my life in the last couple of months. Also, it’s not a single- or double-blind anything, and there’s no control group.  Just me goofing around with some powder I bought on Amazon.  Still, it wasn’t expensive and I thought it would be fun.  Studies indicate it takes about a month to see the effects of myo-inositol on anxiety, and dosing should be in the neighborhood of 12g/day.  I have a 5g scoop so I’m going to do 10g/day (5g 2x a day).

I took this Anxiety Self-Assessment today.  It cost $7 for the full report.  I’ll take it again in about 6 weeks and see if there’s been much change.

Here are my assessment results:

anx1

Anx2

Here’s the text provided verbatim by Psychology Today that describes what you’re looking at in the above graphical representations:

Overall Anxiety (score 53)

Definition – Overall level of anxiety

According to your test results, your level of anxiety is moderate, which means there is a risk that it could become a problem in your life. Although you are generally able to cope, your stress and worry might sometimes interfere with your ability to function in your everyday life. This is nothing to beat yourself up about – anxiety is a very common problem with a wide range of causes. The most important thing however, is that you take active steps to decrease the frequency and intensity of these emotions, so that they don’t dictate the way you carry out your life. Educate yourself by reading informative sources on the subject. You can start by checking out the Advice and Tips section, but if you feel unable to deal with these anxious feelings on your own, don’t hesitate to seek professional help.

Generalized Anxiety (score 36)

Definition – A state of continuous apprehension and anticipation of something horrible, characterized by excessive anxiety and unrealistic worry.

You seem to have very few signs of generalized anxiety and excessive worry. Essentially, this means that you have developed a repertoire of coping strategies as well as a support network for dealing with both the small stressors and the big worries life throws at you. Chances are that you generally sleep well, maintain a stable mood, feel calm, are able to concentrate and are not overly irritable or edgy. Certain things, or just “one of those days”, however, can occasionally take their toll on you. This is not too serious (you are human, after all), but you can always benefit from building on your current coping abilities.

Physiological Anxiety (score 19)

Definition – Somatic manifestations of anxiety such as fatigue, tension, digestive problems, palpitations or pounding heart, sweating, etc.

You appear to show very few, if any physical manifestations of anxiety. Some of the ways our body will signal that it is experiencing high levels of anxiety include fatigue, tension, digestive problems, palpitations or pounding heart, sweating, and a general sense that your health is not up to par. You still may be feeling stress, but you don’t seem to be experiencing any strong somatic symptoms on a regular basis.

Mood Instability (score 60)

Definition – Level of mood instability (mental agitation and psychological distress).

Your score indicates that you sometimes experience a variation in your mood, which may very well be a consequence of an elevated overall anxiety level. You are generally able to remain calm and relaxed but may lose some control of your emotions when faced with stressful situations. This could result in occasional moments of impatience, as well as some moodiness and irritability. Chances are that these mood swings are causing trouble in your relationships with others, although you may not even realize it. Deal with the underlying anxiety that is causing this shift in emotions and it will make you feel better.

Existential Anxiety (score 67)

Definition – Anxiety state related to personal mortality, self-acceptance, guilt, and meaninglessness.

Your score on this scale was moderate, indicating that you are somewhat satisfied with life and are generally able to handle the fact that there are things beyond your control. You feel OK about yourself on the whole, but sometimes experience an excessive amount of discontent. Individuals with this profile may have some difficulty finding meaning in their lives, experience sporadic feelings of futility, or worry about the future. These flashes of existential anxiety have not reached a serious level in your life, but there is the possibility they could create a snowball effect and become more harmful.

Ruminations (score 81)

Definition – Recurrent thoughts that are distressing and disturbing.

According to your results, you tend to over-think your problems. Rather than distracting yourself with more positive activities and thoughts, you almost always dwell on pessimistic feelings. This is an unhealthy habit. Endless reflection can contribute to depression, complicate relationships, and even encourage drug and alcohol abuse. Consider seeking social or professional support, as well as writing your thoughts down.

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So check in with me in 6 weeks or so.  By then perhaps I’ll be a zen-like goddess of harmony and tranquility.

3 thoughts on “Anxiety N=1

  1. I’d be happy to…but I don’t think I have PM on my blog. LOL. You could email me at the link in the sidebar if you wanna!

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