Weaning off Dairy

My poor hormonal balance led to some severe mood swings yesterday.  I couldn’t even write, I was so fatigued and so low.  My life felt completely sucky for a day.  I know it’s the hormones now.  There was a time depression really felt like something was wrong outside of me.  Now I know when I feel that way there’s something wrong with my biology.

On Friday my Wiley Protocol BHRT hormones arrived in the mail.  I felt like this:

Only, you know, substitute the word “hormones” for “phonebook.”  Now I just need my TOM to start and we’re all set.  The data I’ve been collecting indicates that the last time I had a terrible, no good, very bad, hormonal day I got my period 2 days later.  We’ll see if that has any predictive power.

I wanted to mention….Going slow was definitely the right thing to do, as far as weaning our 2-year old off of dairy.  After my consult with Dr. K., it became clear to me that we were going to have to get her off dairy (she is already off grains), given the hormonal disruption in my lineage, which I’ve likely passed on to her.  It’s been taking time for her to learn to replace the nutrition in milk with other food.  Here’s what we’ve been doing:

  1. Discontinued cheese right away.  She liked other snacks just as much, and milk was really the bigger issue because she loves it.
  2. We reduced from unlimited milk to two 8-oz servings a day.  She got one with breakfast and one after her nap with lunch.  They were given to her regardless of whether or not she asked, and never outside these two times.  What this did is detach the delivery of the milk from her requests for it, and made it time-of-day-dependent rather than request-dependent.  The purpose of this was to remove any illusion on her part that she had control over when or how often she got milk, which should result in her requests for milk to stop.  Also, it was clear to both parents what the schedule was because it didn’t change day to day.
  3. Every other day we would reduce her total milk consumption 1 oz.  So basically the first two days she got 16 oz each day, divided into the 2 servings.  The next two days she got 15 oz each day, divided into the 2 servings.  We wrote on our kitchen calendar how many total ounces she was getting each day so there was no question regardless of which parent was there.
  4. We found a substitute that she also likes.  Ice water.  She loves playing with ice cubes.  Whenever she would ask for milk rather than just saying “no” we offer her ice water instead, which involves a whole ritual of her helping to put the ice cubes in the cup.  If regular ice cubes hadn’t been enticing enough we could have made them different colors.  Didn’t need to though.  Now she asks for ice water instead of milk about 80% of the time.  (But she still gets the 2 servings a day regardless of whether or not she asks.)
  5. Now we’re gradually reducing  her daily intake.  We started with 16 ounces (8oz 2x a day) and now we’re down to 11oz (6 oz with breakfast and 5 oz with lunch).  The reduction schedule will continue until she’s off of it completely.
  6. We’ve increased seafood, high fat meats, fruits and veggies for her, to make sure the nutrition she was getting in milk (fat, calcium, and vitamin D) are still in her diet.

I know there are some hard-to-find dairy alternatives…A2 vs A1 dairy, goats milk…?   I don’t know much about these things.  What I do know is that she’s only 2 and her memory processes are still very much in development.  As long as she’s getting the nutrition she needs from other foods she isn’t likely to remember how much she liked milk and cheese.  The trick then will be to try to control other sources of dairy and grains in her life – like, from well-meaning child care providers.  Right now we’re raising her 24 hours a day, but there may come a time she’s in day care.  At that point I hope we’re no longer living in corn country.  People around here just don’t get it.  Anyway, I’ll keep updating as we go with this process.

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